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Liopleurodon ferox by Hyrotrioskjan Liopleurodon ferox by Hyrotrioskjan
This pliosaur from the rocks of Europe became quite famous because of a certain "documentary". 
But while the WWD Liopleurodon is a cool beast, it has not much in common with the real world fossil record.

25m?

Nope, the average Lipleurodon grew up to 5 or 7 meters and in rare cases reached 9 m. Other predators like Machimosaurus, a giant, turtle eating crocodylomorph from the same time, had similar size limits.
The biggest teeth weren't in front of the snout but a bit behind this toothed rosette (Simolestes was more this type of pliosaur) and the whole animal was likely more streamlined, not with this pretty visible wide postorbital region. Also- of course this wasn't known by the WWD makers- the small tail fin was added during the last years with the discovery and rediscovery of soft tissue preservation in at least two cases and two genera.

This picture was a commission for Sven Sachs and Christian Nyhuis who wrote recently a article for the newest issue of "Der Steinkern" a german magazine from fossil collectors for fossil collectors. They wrote about the rare cases where fossils were found (in Germany) that indicate larger pliosaurs with teeth that could be part of an 10 m long Liopleurodon-like animal and some other fragments (nearly all giant pliosaurs we know are preserved very fragmentary).

Here a small look into the other themes of the issue: www.steinkern.de/inhaltsangabe…

Here the paper about giant pliosaurs from Germany (in german): www.academia.edu/11482633/Bele…
Add a Comment:
 
:iconjohnmollison:
JohnMollison Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Your work is enjoyable - thank you for sharing it. :)
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thanks :lol:
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:icontherogoji:
TheroGoji Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2016
Awesome!
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thanks ^^
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:icontsofian:
TSofian Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2016
I think your scuba diver is making a terrible mistake
Reply
:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2016  Professional General Artist
Fortunately it's just a holographic projection.
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:icontsofian:
TSofian Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2016
The animal or the diver?
Reply
:iconthepasthappened:
ThePastHappened Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
:airquotes: "Small"
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2016  Professional General Artist
It's all relative...  ;)
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:iconphillip2001:
Phillip2001 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 26, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I  don't think the real Liopleurodon was so small as shown here.When people from the smaller Liopleurodon speak, they mention only one kind, namely Liopleurodon Ferox.Then  there were other kinds of Liopleurodon such as Liopleurodon Bucklandi.Could it be Liopleurodon Bucklandi, who was the giant, while Liopleurodon Ferox was only a minor subspecies? Something came namely also with Dinosaurs: The European version of the Iguanodon was much larger than the North American.Could it be not (in theory) that it was at the same Liopleurodon.
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2016  Professional General Artist
Define "small", 

Actually there are only two species of Liopleurodon: L. ferox and L. pachydeirus which grow both to 5 to 7 meters in length. In very rare cases they reached maybe 10 m, and newer research could even downsize this estimate.
L. bucklandi is now a nomen dubium.

There is no north american Iguanodon, the fossils which were once thought to be of this genus are now attributed to Dakotadon and I. ottingeri is now a nomen dubium as well.



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:iconphillip2001:
Phillip2001 Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
OK.
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:iconkaijukid23:
Kaijukid23 Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2016
And in the children's movie-companion book, it was pitted againts T-rex and won
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2016  Professional General Artist
:faint:
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:iconwdghk:
WDGHK Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The Liopleurodon now rivals Velociraptor as one of the most overhyped prehistoric predators that gained fame trough lies and misinformation, poor Pliosaurus sure got his thunder stolen.=P (Razz) 

Anyway great artwork, it`s amazing  just how much marine reptiles resembled modern whales especially with their newly discovered counter shade colorations.
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:iconacrocanthosaurusa:
AcrocanthosaurusA Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2016
Still probably an apex predator of it's environment. Just not huge.
Reply
:iconwdghk:
WDGHK Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Not at all, we know that it coexisted with larger pliosaurs like Pliosaurus and Simolestes.
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:iconacrocanthosaurusa:
AcrocanthosaurusA Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2016
There can be multiple apex predators in an ecosystem.
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:iconwdghk:
WDGHK Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It can`t, every ecosystem can only have one apex or top of the food chain predator.
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:iconphillip2001:
Phillip2001 Featured By Owner May 22, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
No,
in the Late Jurassic there were in North America and 4 top predators: Allosaurus, Epanterias, saurophaganax and Torvosaurus.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2016
Nah, only the one on the highest trophic level (the one which isn't itself preyed upon) is the apex predator. The others would be mesopredators.
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:iconacrocanthosaurusa:
AcrocanthosaurusA Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2016
Pliosaurus and Simolestes are of similar size though.
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:iconwdghk:
WDGHK Featured By Owner Edited Feb 6, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You seem to be misinformed, to put it into perspective : Liopleurodon 6,5 m, Simolestes 10 m and Pliosaurus 13 m, it`s very clear who would dominate who and Liopleurodon was more or less a middle of the food chain predator in the late Jurassic seas, a predator of ichyosaurs and plesiosaurs ,but also prey himself for larger pliosaurs.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
I'm pretty sure both of them are larger than Liopleurodon, and among the two, Pliosaurus is the larger one.
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:iconacrocanthosaurusa:
AcrocanthosaurusA Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2016
There is more than one species of pliosaurus .
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2015  Professional General Artist
Thanks a lot =D
Reply
:iconovermind666:
Overmind666 Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2015
how could BBC lie to us like that?!
Reply
:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2016
Rule of Cool.

Don't trust BBC when it comes to paleontology. 

Except Ice Age Giants.
Reply
:iconphillip2001:
Phillip2001 Featured By Owner May 22, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I beg your pardon?!?! BBC makes first times the best documentaries, there has ever been and ever will be. Never channels will appear that can even remotely view this realism while showing of extinct animals !!!Of course you can trust BBC. If you can trust a channel, then definitely BBC. Others do better, or what? Yeah. You can see it from the Spinosaurus: Mega Beasts. He hunts since Rugops and Paralititan but no Onchopristis. BBC hand puts him in: Terra X: Planet Dinosaur so demonstrate how it was 100%. So I would think in advance before I put nonsense in the world.
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2015  Professional General Artist
They didn't lie, they worked with the data they had and assumed some stuff.
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:iconwdghk:
WDGHK Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes but the data you're referring to was fragmentary and controversial at best even back then, so they made a big leap that ultimately they ended up regretting.
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:iconovermind666:
Overmind666 Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2015
yeah and made a big ass error
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2015  Professional General Artist
Indeed, but in hindsight you are always smarter and in other terms it's still the best doc of its kind.
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:iconovermind666:
Overmind666 Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2015
not sure if that's a compliment or sarcasim
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2015  Professional General Artist
It's a compliment for Tim Haines, even with all the inaccuracies in hindsight there is no other doc which brings back the past so well!
This series feels much more like a nature documentary not not a awesome-bro monster show.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2016
The irony is that it's still more inaccurate (and not just now; even back then it was unforgivable) despite not being an awesomebro show (and some of it is very awesomebro)
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2016
LOL are you still being delusional?

For all it's inaccuracies, Walking With Dinosaurs is still far more accurate than awesomebro nonsenses like the ones in Jurassic Fight Club and Jurassic World. Did WWD have a solo theropod kill 5 large sauropods? Did WWD give it's tyrannosaur that bacterial venom nonsense?
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(1 Reply)
:iconblazze92:
bLAZZE92 Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2015
I wish the BBC would remake the show, updated and in the same style.
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:iconovermind666:
Overmind666 Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2015
ah
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:iconhaxex2:
HaxEX2 Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2015  Student Traditional Artist
It's like an adorable plump turtle, without the shel and sporting a massive chomper.
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2015  Professional General Artist
=D
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:icontheregisaurusofkarro:
TheRegisaurusofkarro Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2015
Is the thing on its talk a fin?
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2015  Professional General Artist
Yes it is, there are several plesiosaur fossils now which show that these animals had tail fins =)
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2015
To make up for that massive flamewar;

It doesn't matter if it's 2 tons instead of 250 tons, L. ferox is still a badass oceanic predator.
Reply
:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2015  Professional General Artist
That for sure =)
Reply
:iconericthedude17:
ericthedude17 Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2015  Hobbyist Artist
Is it possible for a marine reptile (like Liopleurodon) to go into fresh water?
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2015  Professional General Artist
It's possible, and there are even one or two freshwater plesiosaurs,  but Liopleurodon stayed most likely just for a short amount of time in this realm.
Reply
:iconericthedude17:
ericthedude17 Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2015  Hobbyist Artist
interesting, I never knew about the tail fluke on Liopleurodon ferox...I will have to redesign some of my sketches. Great work though. Glad you didn't go with the WWD cow print on your Liopleurodon, I never liked that design.
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2015  Professional General Artist
Well, it's just speculation, maybe just long necked plesiosaurs had these flukes,
or it was a feature which was present in every genus, we don't know =)
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:iconyemayema:
YemaYema Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2015  Professional General Artist
Looking great. I like how the scubba diver turned out!
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