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About Varied / Professional Member Joschua Knüppe22/Male/Germany Groups :iconage-of-avians: Age-of-Avians
Sorry Mammals, Birds rule now!
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Wukongopterids by Hyrotrioskjan
Wukongopterids
Two Wukongopterids you don't see often these days. Kunpengopterus sinensis and Darwinopterus linglongtaensis are both species which weren't reconstructed so far which is a shame because both were published in the same paper and are interesting to compare.

Kunpengopterus is represented by an adult specimen. The orbits were relatively small, the wings are longer than in other wukongopterids, the skull long and slender with little remains of a crest on the back. The neck is relatively long. The teeth were small and- compared to Darwinopterus- slender.

This Darwinopterus species on the other side was still a juvenile (I depict it here as a young male with still growing crest and spotted fur), the wings were typically short, the eyes large and the snout robust, even more robust than in D. robustodens (from my point of view. D. robustodens was named after D. linglontaensis and direct comparison is difficult). But even it was a juvenile it was already larger than Kunpengopterus.

I also use this picture  to compare wukongopterits to humans, it's often difficult to determine the size of these animals when you don't know the fossils
personally, you see that they aren't huge but how small is hard to tell from the pictures. I think especially the early wukongopterid artwork and later media presentation made it hard to tell, when you see these pterosaurs hunting small theropods like Anchiornis in midair you don't think its
an often blackbird to crow sized animal.

It's interesting to speculate about the ecology of these closely related taxa which lived at the same place during the same time. The slight differences suggest that they occupied different niches like different species of small songbirds.

These two pictures were produced for an Earth Archive article which was then skipped (but will maybe come now in an different form)

Literature:
New long-tailed pterosaur(Wukongopteridae) frowestern LiaoningChina
Wang et. al. 2010
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Tany tries fishing
Here a quick animation of Tanystropheus fishing from the shore, inspired by Mark Wittions newest painting.

In addition: because this animal most likely waited for prey for longer times I could imagine that it had maybe extendable membranes on the sides of its neck to shade the water, a strange mixture of cobra and black heron. Another protorosaur- Sharovipteryx- is known for gliding membranes so it doesn't seems too unlikely to me.
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The King of rats by Hyrotrioskjan
The King of rats
Happy Easter! I have no lagomorph or platypus for you just large tasty rodents from the sewer which climb up your toilet tube when you don't watch

When the Cave Gardens know one animal which is close to be the biggest herbivore than it's Rattus rex... but well caves have normally no or very few plants so forget that. 
Rattus rex, the Manhattan giant rat, is a often 70 cm long rodent (it's skull alone is often 9 or 10 cm long).
It's closest relative is Rattus norvegicus, the browm rat, maybe the most hated rodent in the world... but also a damn cute beast, also when it's more than a half meter long. Some scientists think that the New York population is just a subspecies of R. norvegicus but I tell you these are fools who just don't like the name!

Beside being a important source of protein for sewer alligators these rats are also sometimes on the menu card of werewolves and neoraptors, hey they are farmed in clean areas and don't taste bad! And no I don't have any particular recipes for you!

I had too much chocolate today so I'm not usable in the moment for better information... well stay tuned and wait for more.

Scale bar 10 cm
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Liopleurodon ferox by Hyrotrioskjan
Liopleurodon ferox
This pliosaur from the rocks of Europe became quite famous because of a certain "documentary". 
But while the WWD Liopleurodon is a cool beast it has not much in common with the real world fossil record.

25m?

Nope, the average Lipleurodon grew up to 5 or 7 meters and in rare cases reached 9 m. Other predators like Machimosaurus, a giant, turtle eating crocodylomorph from the same time, had similar size limits.
The biggest teeth weren't in from of the snout but a bit behind this toothed rosette (Simolestes was more this type of pliosaur) and the whole animal was likely more streamlined, not with this pretty visible wide postorbital region. Also- of course this wasn't known by the WWD makers- the small tail fin was added during the last years with the discovery and rediscovery of soft tissue preservation in at least two cases and two genera.

This picture was a commission for Sven Sachs and Christian Nyhuis who wrote recently a article for the newest issue of "Der Steinkern" a german magazine from fossil collectors for fossil collectors. They wrote about the rare cases where fossils were found (in Germany) that indicate larger pliosaurs with teeth that could be part of an 10 m long Liopleurodon-like animal and some other fragments (nearly all giant pliosaurs we know are preserved very fragmentary).

Here a small look into the other themes of the issue: www.steinkern.de/inhaltsangabe…

Here the paper about giant pliosaurs from Germany (in german): www.academia.edu/11482633/Bele…
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  • Mood: Artistic
  • Reading: The Kingdom of Fungi
  • Watching: Assassins Creed Let's Play
  • Playing: with my sketchbook
  • Eating: cake
  • Drinking: water
A few more things which came to my mind:

John Conway produced a fantastic painting of Dolichorhynchus: johnconway.co/dolichorhynchops…

There is a new book about Crocodylians on the way, written by Gordon Grigg, illustrated by David Kirshner and completely up to date. I know it's a bit pricey *cough* but I already ordered it because my crocodile bookshelf is way too small. www.amazon.de/Biology-Evolutio… and from a look inside and the enthusiastic words of Darren Naish on Facebook I couldn't hold back.

Pterosaurologists are puzzled about the lack of small sized pterosaurs in the very late cretaceous and the absence of juvenile azhdarchids. 
I used some recent train rides to think about it and to read a few chapters of Witton's "Pterosaurs" again. One of the theories about the lack of juvenile and small pterosaurs is that it have something to do with taphonomy. I expanded this a bit and speculated that small and especially young pterosaurs preferred different environments which aren't ideal to preserve fossils. We know for example that many pterosaurs from Solnhofen filled a own ecological niche when still small (which led to to some confusion, because all these juvelines look the same of the firs sight). So flaplings had maybe their own club.
Even more extreme ontogentic changes are known from Sinopterus (a tapejarid). The smallest know individual is known as "Nemicolopterus" and show a remarkably different beak form and a limb anatomy which speaks more for a arboreal animal. pterosaurheresies.files.wordpr… (yes, I know it's from Peters site but it's not Peters work!)
Forests are rarely suited to preserve the remains for animals long enough to turn into fossils, and in the case of Hateg we had likely a dry climate.
So if juvenile and baby tapejarids were forest dwellers it's possible that similar ontogenetic changes were also present azhdarchids, so that the giants moved to the edges of the forests to lay their eggs into the ground and then returned to the more open spaces of their habitat. Pterosaur babies seams to be very mature for their size and were likely able to fly shortly after hatching. Maybe they stayed in the forests their whole youth and didn't leave until they became sexual mature.

These are just my few thoughts about that theme =)

I was recently in Luxembourg to accompany Sven Sachs on a visit to the second best preserved Simolestes specimen known to date, inter alia 
we puzzled together a 1,5 m long jaw which can be seen here: www.facebook.com/7324269534815…

For everyone who hasn't seen it yet, here the video of Paleo Podcast were they roam through the already fantastic Alpha version of the Carboniferous Forest Simulation, a very cool project which try to bring this age back to live: 

There are no animals yet but the project founder promises there will be some Fauna.
The Alpha version can be downloaded here: extra-life.de/index.html

Ok... that should be everything I have to say and share for now.
Have a nice day,

Joachua

deviantID

Hyrotrioskjan
Joschua Knüppe
Artist | Professional | Varied
Germany
Hi, my name is Joschua Knüppe

In the moment I study free art at the Academy of fine arts Münster and I hope to work and teach one day as a independent artist and illustrator.
My work can be split into three big parts:
1. Paleoart and Paleontography
2. fictional ecosystems, some of them on other planets
3. mythical creatures, especially dragons, depicted in a realistic way

All my work is connected together and form large four-dimensional networks which become more and more dense with the time.
In terms of an classic modernist I'm a concept artist, which means that the idea is for me always more important or interesting than the form of it, I still try to improve myself, and I see that it work, but the construct, the concept behind my artwork is the real art.

I love comments, positive and negative, try to reply each of them and 'm always open for questions.

Projects which are belong together and form large four-dimensional networks:
-Part time humans
-Dragons of the world
-Silvanus
-Wegener 2
-Serentopia
-Atzlan
-Future birds and their world
-Organic technology
-Paleoart (with Jurassic Germany and many more)

Out of this I have two other projects:
-Pyrungata
-GDM (Global Dinosaur Monument)

This ID cards have a place for interests and hobbys but I'm interested in too much things so I count them here:
dinosaurs, pterosaurs, mosasaurs, birds, dragons, art, art history, paleontology, walking, annoy creationist, writing, reading, drawing, painting, working with clay wood and metal, ants, biology especially behavior, bio technology, bio informatics, fantasy, SiFi, being at DA, doing exhibtions, holding lectures, arguing and many more.

Well, take a look at my Gallery maybe you find something, beautiful, strange, interesting or more positive adjectives ;)

Copyright:
If you want to use my work ask first, I normally don't mind but I want still the controll over my work. Also I don't like to see my work out of it's original context, how I said: the story behind the pictures is important!

Commissions: I normally don't do commissions, exeptions are for scientists who want a reconstructions. In addition I do sometimes sketches for friends and people who ask friendly =)

Contact:
If you have questions or other reasons to contact me can send me a Note here on DA or mail me under: utahraptor.jo@web.de

I'm now also on Facebook! www.facebook.com/pages/Art-by-…
Interests
  • Mood: Artistic
  • Reading: The Kingdom of Fungi
  • Watching: Assassins Creed Let's Play
  • Playing: with my sketchbook
  • Eating: cake
  • Drinking: water
A few more things which came to my mind:

John Conway produced a fantastic painting of Dolichorhynchus: johnconway.co/dolichorhynchops…

There is a new book about Crocodylians on the way, written by Gordon Grigg, illustrated by David Kirshner and completely up to date. I know it's a bit pricey *cough* but I already ordered it because my crocodile bookshelf is way too small. www.amazon.de/Biology-Evolutio… and from a look inside and the enthusiastic words of Darren Naish on Facebook I couldn't hold back.

Pterosaurologists are puzzled about the lack of small sized pterosaurs in the very late cretaceous and the absence of juvenile azhdarchids. 
I used some recent train rides to think about it and to read a few chapters of Witton's "Pterosaurs" again. One of the theories about the lack of juvenile and small pterosaurs is that it have something to do with taphonomy. I expanded this a bit and speculated that small and especially young pterosaurs preferred different environments which aren't ideal to preserve fossils. We know for example that many pterosaurs from Solnhofen filled a own ecological niche when still small (which led to to some confusion, because all these juvelines look the same of the firs sight). So flaplings had maybe their own club.
Even more extreme ontogentic changes are known from Sinopterus (a tapejarid). The smallest know individual is known as "Nemicolopterus" and show a remarkably different beak form and a limb anatomy which speaks more for a arboreal animal. pterosaurheresies.files.wordpr… (yes, I know it's from Peters site but it's not Peters work!)
Forests are rarely suited to preserve the remains for animals long enough to turn into fossils, and in the case of Hateg we had likely a dry climate.
So if juvenile and baby tapejarids were forest dwellers it's possible that similar ontogenetic changes were also present azhdarchids, so that the giants moved to the edges of the forests to lay their eggs into the ground and then returned to the more open spaces of their habitat. Pterosaur babies seams to be very mature for their size and were likely able to fly shortly after hatching. Maybe they stayed in the forests their whole youth and didn't leave until they became sexual mature.

These are just my few thoughts about that theme =)

I was recently in Luxembourg to accompany Sven Sachs on a visit to the second best preserved Simolestes specimen known to date, inter alia 
we puzzled together a 1,5 m long jaw which can be seen here: www.facebook.com/7324269534815…

For everyone who hasn't seen it yet, here the video of Paleo Podcast were they roam through the already fantastic Alpha version of the Carboniferous Forest Simulation, a very cool project which try to bring this age back to live: 

There are no animals yet but the project founder promises there will be some Fauna.
The Alpha version can be downloaded here: extra-life.de/index.html

Ok... that should be everything I have to say and share for now.
Have a nice day,

Joachua

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:iconelgorfo1:
Elgorfo1 Featured By Owner 2 days ago
You have an amazing gallery than you for sharing, looking forward to the work on non human sapients.
Reply
:icontraheripteryx:
Traheripteryx Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Das musst du gesehen haben! :D
nellucnhoj.deviantart.com/art/…
Reply
:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2015  Professional General Artist
Haha, geil... auch wenn der Brontosaurus schrecklich aussieht =(
Reply
:iconmunkas02:
munkas02 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
YOU HAVE BEEN HUGGED!! *Hug*
Spread the DA love around! (you can copy and paste this message on their userpage!)
RULES:

1- You can hug the person who hugged you!
2- You -MUST- hug 10 other people, at least!
3- You should hug them in public! Paste it on their page!
4- Random hugs are perfectly okay! (and sweet)
5- You should most definitely get started hugging right away!

If You Get 7 Back You Are Loved!
1-3 you're bad friend
4-6 you're an okay friend
7-9 you're a good friend
10-& Up you're loved
Reply
:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2015  Professional General Artist
Sorry I'm happy to be a bad friend =)
Reply
:iconmunkas02:
munkas02 Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
LMFAO
Reply
:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2015  Professional General Artist
Haha, das kannte ich noch nicht =D

(sollte ich mir vielleicht für die Neoraptoren merken ;))
Reply
:iconammonitefiction:
AmmoniteFiction Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
:D
Reply
:icontraheripteryx:
Traheripteryx Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Wenn die Raptor Agency reinstürmt... ;)
Wir Nahnmwraki nehmen lieber Türen! :XD: Vor allem Kumakatok!
Reply
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